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Benefits for children

Physiball Programme

“Children learn to move and play; and move and play to learn”Tracy Prowse, Physiotherapist & PhysiFun Founder

Our children are spending more time in a seated or horizontal position than ever before and even the dinner table, where we needed to sit up straight, has often been abandoned in favour of the couch. Shrinking backyards and access to open play areas where children get incidental exercise as well as increasing amounts of screen time (TV’s, tablets and computers) can all reduce the time that children are physically active.

Children learn in different ways and at different speeds and Physiball provides specific information for teachers to assist all children in foundation phase Gr 000 – Gr3 who are ages 3 – 8 years wishing to get a good physical development background to their learning. The younger the children are the more important it is to play and move.  Children learn through their play and movement. ‘The younger the child is, the more they should move & play in order to learn.

PhysiFun is committed to sharing up-to-date and relevant information with teachers, parents and schools that gives children increased opportunities to practise little and often in order for them to thrive at home, at school, on the sports field and in their community.

What are the benefits for children?

Regular participation in PhysiFun’s programmes can have the following improvements:

  • Enhanced core strength; postural control as well as shoulder and arm control
  • Greater balance and co-ordination
  • Enhanced intrinsic motivation during challenging tasks
  • Better concentration and handwriting skills
  • Improved general fitness and health

Which children benefit from Physiball?

PhysiFun (7)Children who:

  • Are in Gr000 – Gr3
  • Are 3-8 years old
  • Have Limited Concentration
  • Appear distracted,
  • Are fidgety,
  • Appear to avoid drawing activities
  • Prefer not to participate in physical play / sport,
  • ADHD
  • ADD
  • Are overweight
  • Appear too shy or nervous/give up or finds it’s too much hard work

As well as children who may have fine and gross motor difficulties such as:

  • Clumsiness
  • Unable to hop or jump
  • Poor pencil grip
  • Have poor handwriting,
  • Uncoordinated
  • Poor postural ‘core’ control
  • Tires easily
  • Floppy
  • Overly ‘bendy’

PhysiFun’s ‘learning through play’ lectures promote physical activity in all areas of a child’s learning. Movement and activity plays an important role in the health, well-being and quality of life of all individuals.  Childhood is a critical time to prevent the onset of obesity and to support and enhance children’s health-related behaviours.

PhysiFun is committed to sharing up-to-date and relevant information with teachers, parents and schools that gives children increased opportunities to practice little and often in order for them to thrive at home, at school; on the sports field and in their community.

Physifit Programme

A child’s history of injury is a risk factor for future injury both in their youth and adulthood. It is also a contributor to long term degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis. Physifit’s programmes provide strength, agility and proprioceptive exercise training which can significantly redue injuries thus ensuring children remain active for life.

Which children benefit from Physifit?

Physifit benefits young sports players who wish to remain injury & pain free.

As well as children who may:

  • Have a history of sport related injury
  • Kids with poor overall muscle and core strength
  • Want to enjoy exercise for life
  • Age 8- 18 years old

What will teachers gain from attending a Physifit course?

Physifit gives PE teachers & sports coaches specific recommendations around:PhysiFun (4)

  • Sport specific scheduled rest periods and limits
  • Training workload and growth rates and early adolescence.
  • Preseason conditioning evidence based exercise programme
  • Pre practice neuromuscular training programme
  • Proper sizing of equipment, especially as child grows.
  • Avoiding early sport specialization and emphasising skill development
  • Avoiding injuries early
  • Assess for menstrual dysfunction in girls.
  • Prevention of concussion and heatstroke
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